18.58 – Life determines our problems; we determine their size

by Chaitanya Charan dasJune 16, 2013

We often feel irritated, overwhelmed, helpless when our dreams are wrecked by things beyond our control.

But there is always something in our control. The problems may not be in our control, but our response is. If we keep thinking about the problem, that frequently makes it grow bigger than what it is or needs to be. Of course, we need to think about the problem to be able to deal with it effectively. But often we get so emotionally shaken that our thoughts get caught inside the problem. This makes our thinking not constructive but destructive. The more we think about the problem, the more our clarity, our composure and our confidence ebb away.

To make our thinking constructive, we need an alternative object of thought that helps us regain our perspective. Gita wisdom provides the best such object when it recommends that we think of Krishna constantly. The Bhagavad-gita (18.58) underscores that we can cross over all problems by Krishna’s grace if we just become conscious of him. The relevant Sanskrit word tarishyasi has the connotation of floating over, which indicates that our Krishna consciousness raises us above the problem so that we can float over it.

How does this happen?

When we remember that we are eternal souls who are eternal recipients of Krishna’s eternal love, we learn to see problems for what they are – temporary and transient. Matters of concern, no doubt. But not matters of life or death, as they seem to be when due to spiritual unawareness we equate life with our present material existence.

Our Krishna-connection brings us an unflappable inner calm that helps us find our way amidst problems and keep moving towards life’s supreme destination, the place that is free from all problems – Krishna’s world of love.

 

 

 

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Chaitanya Charan das
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